Fall Drive

It was cool and rainy when we started the drive but as the day progressed, the sky cleared and the roads dried out. A number of Ferrari’s were on the drive as well as 3 generations of Porsche Turbo’s, a 1976, 1994 and 2011 that blasted over the leaf covered roads. A friend took some lovely photos of the cars at speed and here is one of my favorites. The car looks as though its hovering above the road but swimming more than hovering in the air.

Ferrari 275 GTB/4

4 Cam 275GTB.

Zach, Bill and I organize a few of these day long tours and you can learn more about them through the Europa Mothership website.

 

 

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1984 Porsche 911 Carrera “M491″

I was wondering what the “M” in “M491″ “Turbo Look” meant.  This Carrera has all the paperwork showing the $11,390 option “Turbo Look” which is described the same way on the Certificate of Authenticity. On the underside of the front hood, it shows the sticker with options showing 491 as one of the option codes. Option translated into German is “Option”. It does say M_Ausst but I don’t know what this translates into. Any hints anyone?

Turbo Look Carrera Coupe Option

Porsche Turbo Look Option

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Photos of Tool Kit for 330GT 2+2

Most Ferrari’s of the 60′s had tool kits that were very similar so if you want to see some photos of a 275/330 or late 250, here are some images. This 330 has a remarkably complete kit with some of the little juicy bit like the Dunlop brake bleeder tin and the small tin box with spare tire valve cores and caps. Its crazy to see how well preserved and vivid the colors are. Typically, the tin containers are dented from rolling around in the trunk but these items are nearly as perfect as are the rest of the tools.

Ferrari tool kit valves

Ferrari tool kit bleeder tube

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Here are some more photos of the tool kit. The adjustable wrench isn’t supposed to be there.  “King Dick”.

Ferrari 330GT 2+2 Tool Wrap Kit

Ferrari 330GT2+2 tool wrap

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More Photos of 330GT 2+2 Details

I used an example in the previous post of the subjective nature of how bright a Borrani wheel should be. Borrani was an industrial supply company so I doubt the chrome was highly polished nor was the alloy rim. The rest of the chrome on Ferrari’s was similarly dull in comparison to the super straight and mirror like chrome on restored cars.  In my personal opinion, when you are restoring a very expensive car, the chrome and paint should be brilliant. The body work should be laser straight, the panel fit excellent and interior perfect.

When you look at an original Ferrari, you can see so much bare steel and layers of bodywork sandwiched together without any protective coatings or seam sealer. A recently restored Ferrari should restored where everything should be sealed up to be preserved for much longer than originally intended.

I should say that the body on this car is incredible. The door gaps and shut lines are perfect. The paint looks good from the top but there are many ugly areas down low at the rocker panels. There are many touched up areas on this car that I believe to be done at the factory. However, if Pininfarina spent some more time sealing up the nooks and crannies, fewer of these cars would have rusted into the storm drains of Paris and Milano.

Ferrari Paint Orignal details

Ferrari 330 Pininfarina Nocciola

Notice the light application of paint under the rocker panel trim.

Ferrari Pininfarina 330 2+2

Bottom of the door showing primer on a Pininfarina Ferrari 330

Pretty scary finish details on this door. Mostly primer protects this door.

 

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Very Orignal Ferrari 330GT 2+2

If you ask someone who remembers owning or servicing Ferrari’s back in the 1950′s or 1960′s, they will probably tell you that they weren’t very well finished. My father often says that we make the cars significantly better than they were when new. Judges on the show field have been known to deduct points for a car that is “over-restored” which must be a very hard thing to determine.

Most Ferrari’s from the 50′s and 60′s have Borrani wire wheels. How brightly they are polished seems like a bit of a sliding scale. If you spend $5000 to have your wheels rebuilt, don’t you want them to be highly polished? I have seen many photos of a Ferrari chassis rolling on Borrani wheels while the body is being constructed at a coach builders shop so there is no way the wheels were shiny after that gritty process. I would guess that Borrani used more of an industrial chrome plating on the spokes and hubs and lightly polished the alloy rim but you wouldn’t need sunglasses to look at them!

Another example is the satin black paint on the chassis and engine bay. From what I have seen, it appeared to have been hastily applied by brush right over dirt and weld spatter. I’ve always tried tried to imagine how the rubberized undercoating was applied and picture someone holding up cardboard to prevent over-spray while blowing it on in heavy coats.

Pininfarina used some different practices than Scaglietti but overall, I think there was lots of similarity. Pininfarina used super heavy rubberized undercoating that looked like sagging elephant skin. Scaglietti used a lighter coat of “pebbly” rubberized undercoat.

Anyhow, we had a incredibly orignal 1964 Ferrari 330GT 2+2 in the shop last month. This car has 3000 miles and was perfectly preserved in a dry climate so you can see all the evidence of the original build practices. In the next few blog posts, I will show some of the intricate details on how this car was finished 50 years ago. If you are interested in getting a flash drive of all the details of this car, let me know.

Rear Leaf Spring Ferrari 330GT Chassis

Ferrari 330GT Chassis Rear

Here, you can see the thick “elephant skin” undercoating and other details like black oxide radius arm bolts. You can see lots of gold over-spray on the thick undercoating. This may mean the car was painted after the undercoating or the car was touch up after it was assembled. There are many other areas of touched up paint on the car.

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Front Suspension detail of Ferrari 330GT

Note the think Dijon mustard colored paint on the bottom of the cross member but the thick dripping black paint on the radiator support. The Chassis does not appear to have been painted like many restored cars. It is more a blend of over spray and rubberized undercoating. Note how sloppily the yellow tamper evident paint was applied!

Undercoating details on a Pininfarina Ferrari

Undercoating on a Ferrari 330GT 2+2

Look at the heavy undercoating on the chassis tube.

 

 

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BMW 3.0CS Fjord Blue

Over the last few weeks, we have had three BMW E9 3.0CS’s in the shop. A silver CSi was here for service, a green CS just sold and this blue car is still looking for a new home. This is a very clean CA car with all records from new. It has all 3 sets of keys which is a blessing as they are so hard to duplicate.

1972 BMW 3.0 CS

BMW CS 1972

The car has some tasteful modifications like Weber Carbs, tube headers and Alpina wheels. The interior is extremely nice and appears to be original but I can’t tell for sure if its been re-upholstered. The carpeting is original brown loop and the trunk lid mounted took kit is complete and nearly perfect.

Original BMW Toolkit

BMW 3.0CS Toolkit

Having lived in dry climates, this car is extremely solid. The front fenders were repainted but the rest of the paint is faded original and considering the age, its really nice. BMW E9′s were built by Karmann Coachworks and had a tendency to rust away very quickly. There is a cavity in the front fender area that fills with debris and moisture causing massive structural damage to the car. Using a mirror and flashlight, this area is solid on the car. It appears that other problem areas are clean and solid except for some rust caused by abrasion from the wheels on the rocker panel covers.

BMW E9 on the lift

BMWE93.0CSphoto

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Interior on BMW 3.0CS Leather

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Tube Headers, 3.0 6 cylinder

 

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Porsche 356SC Cabriolet

We have had this 1964 Porsche 356SC Cabriolet at the shop for nearly a year and just got word from the owner that the car is for sale. There is a Porsche Certificate of Authenticity verifying that it is matching numbers and was finished in the same colors as you see here, Slate Gray with Fawn Leather.

The SC is the final evolution to the 356 lineup and is very collectible. This car is a very solid and straight example that needs some time to get it running after many years of storage. In the next few weeks we will drain the gas and fluids, bleed the brakes and get her going.

Please let me know if you want first dibs on this treasure, we are asking $185,000 in running condition.

Porsche Cabriolet

Porsche 356SC Cabriolet

Porsche 356SC Fawn

356SC Cab Interior Fawn

Porsche 356 Cabriolet

Porsche 356SC Engine, Solex Carburetors

 

 

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Dino 206GT

Late last summer a customer called me to pick up his newly acquired Dino 206GT. He told me that it was fully restored in the UK but needed to be checked out after the overseas voyage and address a few little squeaks and issues. Then he asked, “How long will it take?” Having never seen the car, I told him that I can’t estimate the timing but will get it scooped up right away.

Like the other projects we have received lately, the car was absolutely magnificent…. but nothing worked. Someone made a custom muffler that vibrated and leaked so badly that we had to replace it. The fuel filler neck hose was installed with such a kink that it split allowing gas to spray all over on right hand turns or when filling it with gas. The brand new clutch cable was rubbing so hard against the steering U-Joint that it wore through it and made the steering feel horrible. After moving the cable away from the steering shaft, the steering still felt horrible because the pinion shaft on the rack was loose and moving up and down.

Ultimately, we did a ton of mechanical repairs and ended up addressing some cosmetic items and made the car drive wonderfully. I drove the car home and needed the defroster fan which I could hear humming away but it wasn’t moving any air. When I got to the shop, I found that the fan housing was cracked which someone tried to seal with an excessive amount of silicone. They inadvertently glued the fan blade to the housing and the motor shaft was spinning inside the fan blade! Insane.

This car is so beautiful that I didn’t want it hanging around the shop for too long, you’ll see what I mean from these photos.

 

Ferrari 206GT Dino

Dino Ferrari 206

1969 Ferrari 206GT Dino

Ferrari Dino 1969

 

Ferrari 206GT Blower Fan

Blower Fan Ferrari Dino 206

Filler Neck Hose Ferrari Dino

Ferrari Dino Filler Neck hose

 

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308 Major Service

Belt Service Ferrari 308

Ferrari Belt Service

The Ferrari “Major Service” is super contentious and I am about to add another wrinkle to it all. In most Ferrari owner handbooks, the “Major Serivice” for Ferrari’s with Cam Belts is due every 10 years or 30,000 miles. Most cars with rubber timing belts use 80-100,000 mile service intervals but the belts Ferrari sourced only last for a 1/4 of those miles.

In order for dealers to sell Authorized Used Ferrari’s, they need to perform a thorough check over and if the belts have not been replaced within the last 5 years, they have to replace them. This has gotten many people to believe that the belts have to be replaced every 5 years. Dealers probably like customers sticking to the 5 year interval because belts services are good profit jobs. You don’t have to diagnose anything and are replacing parts which often don’t even need replacement.

We used to do belt services on 308′s, BB’s and TR’s for a relative set price but lately it seems that things have changed. We did a “Major” on a TR this spring that required so many other repairs. The brakes were leaking, shock bushings were toasted and many other items were just worn out and deteriorated.

We just finished another service on a 308 and many things that we never had to address were in desperate need of repair or rebuild. The lower timing belt drive pulley bearings are bad, the shocks all need an overhaul and the suspension bushings are all dried out and falling apart. The distributor advance mechanisms were worn and even the pin that the ignition points pivot on is broken and loose. The radiator was removed to be checked and a bunch of tubes were plugged so we had to re-core it.

So, what we have discovered is that a good running  and driving rubber timing belt car can have many more needs than just a valve lash and water pump. If you go by a 10-12 year interval, I almost guarantee that an oil leak, water pump leak or some other problem will require an engine out or a need to access part of the engine where it makes sense to replace the belts and do other services. So, don’t get caught up in timing belt interval timing but when it is the right time to service your car, be prepared for a heavier cost.

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Ferrari 328 Upholstery

Last winter a friend found this 1986 Ferrari 328 in a nasty old building that was nearing collapsed. I bought the car sight unseen and was saddened by the condition of the interior. It was delivered new to Saudi Arabia with a “Crema” or Cream White interior with the  striking “Blu Chiaro” paint as seen in the photo.

Years later, it came to the USA where someone installed tan seats and spray dyed the rest of the interior to match. When I bought the car, the leather felt like it had a plastic coating and dirty white leather showed around all of the switches, knobs and pockets. This was totally unacceptable.

We disassembled the entire interior, dash, headliner, and trunk to clean and reupholster everything. It took awhile to locate thread to match the “Crema” and to find the pin striped headliner material but it was worth the wait because the finished product is stunning. I didn’t want to recover the dash but the previous owner screwed a radar detector mount to it and mounted another bracket for one of those old school phones. Now, the entire interior is new and all matches.

1986 Ferrari 328 Interior

Ferrari 328GTS Interior

Blue Chiaro and Crema Ferrari 328

Blue Chiaro Ferrari 328GTS

2 Comments »

  1. Rob said,

    May 14, 2016 @ 10:58 am

    Blu Chiaro is such a stunning color and one that really must be seen in person to be appreciated. Will this one be going into your inventory soon?

  2. admin said,

    May 15, 2016 @ 6:35 pm

    Hey Rob, I have already sold the car, stunning color combo!!

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