More Photos of 330GT 2+2 Details

I used an example in the previous post of the subjective nature of how bright a Borrani wheel should be. Borrani was an industrial supply company so I doubt the chrome was highly polished nor was the alloy rim. The rest of the chrome on Ferrari’s was similarly dull in comparison to the super straight and mirror like chrome on restored cars.  In my personal opinion, when you are restoring a very expensive car, the chrome and paint should be brilliant. The body work should be laser straight, the panel fit excellent and interior perfect.

When you look at an original Ferrari, you can see so much bare steel and layers of bodywork sandwiched together without any protective coatings or seam sealer. A recently restored Ferrari should restored where everything should be sealed up to be preserved for much longer than originally intended.

I should say that the body on this car is incredible. The door gaps and shut lines are perfect. The paint looks good from the top but there are many ugly areas down low at the rocker panels. There are many touched up areas on this car that I believe to be done at the factory. However, if Pininfarina spent some more time sealing up the nooks and crannies, fewer of these cars would have rusted into the storm drains of Paris and Milano.

Ferrari Paint Orignal details

Ferrari 330 Pininfarina Nocciola

Notice the light application of paint under the rocker panel trim.

Ferrari Pininfarina 330 2+2

Bottom of the door showing primer on a Pininfarina Ferrari 330

Pretty scary finish details on this door. Mostly primer protects this door.

 

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Very Orignal Ferrari 330GT 2+2

If you ask someone who remembers owning or servicing Ferrari’s back in the 1950′s or 1960′s, they will probably tell you that they weren’t very well finished. My father often says that we make the cars significantly better than they were when new. Judges on the show field have been known to deduct points for a car that is “over-restored” which must be a very hard thing to determine.

Most Ferrari’s from the 50′s and 60′s have Borrani wire wheels. How brightly they are polished seems like a bit of a sliding scale. If you spend $5000 to have your wheels rebuilt, don’t you want them to be highly polished? I have seen many photos of a Ferrari chassis rolling on Borrani wheels while the body is being constructed at a coach builders shop so there is no way the wheels were shiny after that gritty process. I would guess that Borrani used more of an industrial chrome plating on the spokes and hubs and lightly polished the alloy rim but you wouldn’t need sunglasses to look at them!

Another example is the satin black paint on the chassis and engine bay. From what I have seen, it appeared to have been hastily applied by brush right over dirt and weld spatter. I’ve always tried tried to imagine how the rubberized undercoating was applied and picture someone holding up cardboard to prevent over-spray while blowing it on in heavy coats.

Pininfarina used some different practices than Scaglietti but overall, I think there was lots of similarity. Pininfarina used super heavy rubberized undercoating that looked like sagging elephant skin. Scaglietti used a lighter coat of “pebbly” rubberized undercoat.

Anyhow, we had a incredibly orignal 1964 Ferrari 330GT 2+2 in the shop last month. This car has 3000 miles and was perfectly preserved in a dry climate so you can see all the evidence of the original build practices. In the next few blog posts, I will show some of the intricate details on how this car was finished 50 years ago. If you are interested in getting a flash drive of all the details of this car, let me know.

Rear Leaf Spring Ferrari 330GT Chassis

Ferrari 330GT Chassis Rear

Here, you can see the thick “elephant skin” undercoating and other details like black oxide radius arm bolts. You can see lots of gold over-spray on the thick undercoating. This may mean the car was painted after the undercoating or the car was touch up after it was assembled. There are many other areas of touched up paint on the car.

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Front Suspension detail of Ferrari 330GT

Note the think Dijon mustard colored paint on the bottom of the cross member but the thick dripping black paint on the radiator support. The Chassis does not appear to have been painted like many restored cars. It is more a blend of over spray and rubberized undercoating. Note how sloppily the yellow tamper evident paint was applied!

Undercoating details on a Pininfarina Ferrari

Undercoating on a Ferrari 330GT 2+2

Look at the heavy undercoating on the chassis tube.

 

 

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Ferrari Daytona Deer Accident

This Daytona came in recently for repairs after it struck a deer. We had to rebuild so much of the front, all the tubing was bent and radiator was damaged. We were happy with how it came out. It was a struggle to find out how the front plexi-glass should look when finished because there were so many different details from the cars we photographed.

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Repair to the front of a Ferrari Daytona

Ferrari 365GTB/4 Front repair

Accident Repair Ferrar 365

Front end to a Ferrari 365GTB/4 Daytona

Bodywork repair on Ferrari Daytona

Ferrari Daytona Bodywork

 

Ferrari Daytona Coupe Early Production

Plexiglass front Daytona Coupe

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512BB Ferrari

A few weeks ago Bill told me about a few Ferrari 512 Berlinetta Boxer coming up for sale and since the timing was right, I pulled the trigger and bought it. When it arrived, I was kind of disappointed with the paint but very impressed with the rest of the car, the interior is great, dash is perfect and it drives like new. It constantly reinforces how much I like BB512′s with carburetors.

Ferrari 512BB Berlinetta Boxer

Ferrari Boxer

One of the most interesting things about this car is the perfectly preserved tool case. These are extremely delicate items that often get kicked around or left in a damp location to get moldy and break down but this is one of the best I have seen, testament to the original and well kept condition of the car.

Tool Case for Ferrari 512BB

Ferrari Boxer Tool Case

I am working on honing in my video skills and equipment to make more videos of the cars, here is one of my first attempts to make a short and simple video of this car. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iB5NxR3ajuc

 

 

 

 

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Porsche 964 Speedster

1994 Porsche Speedster

1994 Porsche Speedster

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This is a unique car that a friend has asked me to sell. This is a spectacular example that needs nothing to be driven this Spring.

 

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Some Photos Around the Shop

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Exhaust Pony Motor Part

Here are some random things that we have been working on lately. My Uncles have a large Earth Moving company and just celebrated their 50 anniversary in business. In order to celebrate some of the equipment that has been used since the early 60′s had to be repaired to mark the occasion. I was asked to repair this “S” curved exhaust pipe that pumps hot exhaust from the “Pony Motor” through the intake manifold of the big diesel engine. This preheats the diesel engine before you engage a clutch to make the “Pony Motor” turn it over and start it up. I made this jig to precisely re-make the exhaust pipe in Stainless Steel so it wouldn’t rust out in 50 years like this one!

Heat Shields Ferrari Header

Ferrari 330 Exhaust Heat Shield

We had a 1966 Ferrari 330 in the shop that was missing the exhaust header heat shields. We ended up making new ones.

Ferrari 330 GTC Repairs

Ferrari 330 GTC for some minor Repairs

This spectacular 330 GTC was in the shop for a host of minor repairs that turned out to be a large job. We took out the incorrect brake booster and master and replaced it with the correct stuff. We also replaced the radiator core, installed my newly manufactured A/C vents and knobs and got the engine to run much better. Someday, the owner wants us to re-paint the car in the original color.

Maserati Ghibli V8

Maserati Ghibli 4.9 V-8

I can’t remember if I have posted on this subject, a Maserati Ghibli Spyder Restoration. Rolf has done a magnificent job rebuilding this engine that was missing tons of parts. The whole car was taken apart 10 years ago and many of the critical parts were lost so we really had to take our time making sure everything was just right. There will be more posts on this engine assembly in the next few weeks. What a great engine, I have been a fan of Maserati engines since riding around Lime Rock Race Track in a 450S Maserati at the age 10.

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Ferrari 365 GT 2+2 Wheels

Now that I am finished with my part of the project, these wheels are off to Syl’s shop to be painted. They came off a 1968 Ferrari 365 GT 2+2, affectionately called the “Queen Mother” in our small and incestuous community. These are really attractive wheels and are beautifully cast in Magnesium Alloy.  Along the rim edge is a very deep cut reverse curve that ends in a very thin edge. Every edge on this set of wheels was beat up by sloppy workmanship when changing tires or sloppy driving while grinding on a curb in an attempt to park.

Mag Wheel Repair to Ferrari

Wheel Repair to Ferrari 365 Mag Wheel

Ferrari Wheel Repair, Welding

Repairing Ferrari 365 Wheel

Ferrari Mag Wheel Welded and repaired

Ferrari Welded Wheel

 

I tried to weld only the busted areas but ended up welding along the entire edge and set it up in the lathe to re-cut that delicate area. It is amazing how easy this Magnesium welds once the whole part is warmed up properly. It builds up in such big bubble gum beads that it only took two passes to get enough material on to eventually cut it down to the desired profile. This photo shows only a small area welded but I ended up doing the whole edge for a uniform radius.

After the welding, I sent them to be crack tested as these wheels have a tendency to fatigue at the rim edge and cause the tire to blow out. I have also seen photos of the wheel breaking right at the hub area which is super thick so they must have had some casting flaws in some wheels.

The next step was to dip each wheel in an acid etch followed by “Anodine 1210″ solution to convert the wheel to a neutral condition and protect the casting until I could primer it to seal it against the atmosphere. Magnesium corrodes instantly so the Anodine protects the metal while it dries out. My last step it so shoot the wheels with Zinc Chromate Primer just like they used when the wheels were first painted. I can get this primer in Yellow or pale green so I stuck with the original shade.

365 Ferrari WHeels Magnesium

Magnesium Alloy Wheels for Ferrari 365

Syl will really make the wheels pop with some properly applied polyester filler and another coat of urethane primer which will be sanded to bowling ball smoothness. He shoots the wheels with a PPG basecoat in bright aluminum followed by a Clear Coat that has some flattening agent to dull them down about 20%. Wheels were never totally shiny because they would detract from the bodywork on the car. These wheels will be a little nicer than the original finish but we have different standards these days.

 

 

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Jaguar XKE Roadster and Coupe

We just got a few Jaguar XKE’s for our inventory, a green 1966 XKE Series I Roadster and a 1971 Series II Coupe. I first saw this Roadster this spring at a friend’s shop in PA. and stupidly didn’t just buy it right then and there. Anyhow, now its here and looking splendid in its British Racing Green with Biscuit Leather color combination and wonderful overall condition. There has been so much interest in XKE’s lately that I have a few other ones on back burner so let me know if you are interested in purchasing one. I purchased a low miles 1966 Roadster in CA, have a lead on a 1966 4.2 Coupe and a friend in Florida has two magnificent S-I Roadsters, both confirmed 100 point JCNA Judged cars.

The red car came in from Ohio and its an incredibly straight, solid and complete car. I did a blog post on it a week ago but now that its at the shop I wanted to share some better photos of the car. This XKE Coupe has some cosmetic issues that I will may deal with but the mechanical condition is outstanding. The engine was overhauled recently, transmission shifts perfectly, final drive is silent, its simply a great driving XKE. The floors and rocker panels are totally solid and all of the bright trim and glass is perfect so any work to clean up the paint or interior will be well matched to a sound driving car.

Later this week I am going to get some photos of the undercarriage to share with anyone who is interested.

XKE Roadster in BRG

British Racing Green XKE

1971 XKE Coupe Jaguar

XKE Series II Coupe 1971

S-I and S-II XKE's For Sale

Series I and II Jaguar XKE’S

 

 

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Very Special Porsche 912′s

Over the last few months, I have been around a number of Porsche 912′s. Anyone who frequents this website knows that I really like early Porsche 911′s so it seems natural that I’d like 912′s but to be honest, I’ve only worked on a few of them but really don’t remember much about them.

This winter, a local man needed his 912 appraised to help settle his fathers estate. His father bought the car new and kept it in impeccable condition. It wasn’t restored, had a weak re-paint in the original color but everything else was tidy, solid and the car was complete with the books and tools and tons of records. Driving the car was a delight, it doesn’t sound like a racing car the way a 911 does but 4 cylinder 912 feels as fast as the 6 cylinder engine of the same year.

1969 Porsche 912

1969 Porsche 912 in original color, one family ownership history

1969 Porsche 912 interior

Original interior for 1969 Porsche 912

In February I visited a friend who just got another dark red, one owner 912 in his shop that he offered to sell me. He needed a month to clean the car, polish the paint and make sure it ran like new, then he would let me have first chance to buy the car. He sent me photos of the car after the clean up and I had to have the car and immediately sent him a check for his asking price. A few days later a very good customer of mine called and I told him about this 1968 912 and he held his hand high in the air for the car. It turns out that he bought the last “one owner” 911 that I had in 2011, the car I affectionately called ‘ol silver, a ’72 911 T Coupe.

Now Michael has two of my favorite “901″ cars, both of them under fastidious care from new and the tradition continues

1968 912 Coupe Burgendy for sale

'68 912 Porsche

1968 Porsche 912 in the shop

In the shop, next to 911 and Ghibli

1968 912 Porsche engine

Engine in the '68 912, original and immaculate

A few weeks ago I saw a beautiful 1976 Triumph TR-6 on ebay. I bid on the car but the next morning realized that I wasn’t the high bidder, I was off by $750. Fortunately, the seller, Branden in Seattle, called me the next to day to offer me the car because the high bidder needed a loan to buy the car and wanted the title sent before paying for the car! I pulled a muscle in my arm as I raised it so high for the car. Branded asked me if I was looking for other cars and I sent him my “must have” list. Within a few days he sent me photos of this 1968 912 in its original color, Polo Red. This car looked outstanding in the photos because it has a gorgeous interior without holes cut in the door panels for speakers and a perfect dash pad. The front pan, floors and longitudinal sections are absolutely straight and perfect, the bottom of the doors are perfect and other than the thousands of stone pecks on the front hood and old paint, the car is damn near perfect.

The car arrived on May 6th and I was absolutely blown away with the car and equally impressed with the care of ownership since 1968. There is a 3 ring binder in the car with EVERY reciept from new! Every part purchased, every oil change and service job! It has had a few owners but they all continued the tradition of maintaining the car and keeping record of every detail. What is it with these 912′s?

1968 Porsche 912 in Polo Red

Polo Red 1968 Porsche 912

1968 Porsche 912 Original interior

Original interior for the 1968 Porsche 912

Records for the 1969 Porsche 912

912 Porsche records for maintenance

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Jaguar XKE Engine Overhaul

4.2 Liter XKE

Overhauled Jaguar XKE Engine

Its been years since we have overhauled a Jaguar engine and are pleasantly surprised at how many high quality parts are available for reasonable prices with instant availability. We have been struggling to get parts for Ferrari engines over the years, each piston set has to be custom made which takes 10 weeks, hardware isn’t available, what a pain to keep the motivation. The only thing that takes time on the Jaguar engine is scheduling time with a machine shop to hone the block, perform a valve job, and grind the crankshaft.

The shop that sold us the parts had Mahle Pistons sitting on the shelf and kits to replace all of the hardware, core plugs, sealing washers, lock tabs and timing chain guides and sprockets. We were all blown away at how little clearance needed for these Mahle pistons to fit into the block, only .02″!

Of course there is the labor at our shop, first removing the engine and breaking it down which makes a huge mess, then cleaning all of the parts in our awesome new hot water dunk tank. With Ferrari engines, we have to drill out (destroy) the crankshaft plugs in order to clean the passages but on the Jag, the plugs are re-usable. Plus the passages are huge and easy to clean, have a look at all the metallic sludge built up in there. We also removed the engine block core plugs and got the huge amount of rusty crud out of there.

The engine is almost finished now, probably by the end of next week it will be finished up and ready to test run. I’m excited to hear it run again.

Plugs in Jaguar Crank

Crankshaft full of Sludge

Block for Jaguar

XKE 4.2 Engine block

 

 

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