FIAT Dino

2400 FIAT Dino Spyder

2400 FIAT Dino Spyder

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Transmission Numbers on Ferraris

I don’t offer much helpful information on this blog but want to share some photos of the font and progression of transmission, engine, and axle number stampings on Ferrari castings. From now on, i’m going to photograph stamps on Ferrari castings as I have the ability, the transmission stamps are hard to photograph because the interior has to come out for access. These are all photographs of Transmissions from 250’s and 330’s.  As things progress, I will post photos of Engines, axles and trans-axles.

Numbers from early 330 with Overdrive

Numbers from early 330 with Overdrive

Series II PF Cab, late production

Series II PF Cab, late production

Early production GTE Ferrari

Early production GTE Ferrari

Transmission Ferrari Lusso 250

Transmission Ferrari Lusso 2505-speed 2 mount engine

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Photos of the Lusso and 340 body

Lusso Ferrari Scaglietti

Lusso Ferrari Scaglietti

166, Lusso, 340, Ferrari,

166, Lusso, 340, Ferrari,

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Couple of cars

Ferrari 330, Porsche 356

Ferrari 330, Porsche 356

A local guy just purchased this 330 GT 2+2 and has asked us to take a look at the car before he drives it this summer. It is one of the best paint jobs I have ever seen on a Ferrari, super crisp lines and totally flat panels because it was block sanded to perfection and there isn’t a spot of orange peel anywhere. These bigger Ferraris look great in colors such as Argento or Azuro.

The Porsche is ready for delivery after spending time to sort out some tie rod details and brake overhaul. I had a chance to take the car for a long drive and am continually amazed at how wonderful these cars are.

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Ferrari 512BB Boxer engine running on the stand

Here is the BB engine, finished up and running on the stand with a link below to see it on youtube. No leaks! Needs a little more tuning but this is the second start up and it ran very well. Since this video was taken, we dialed in the carburetors and it sounds amazing.

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Ferrari axle

After overhauling nearly every part on the yellow GTE and driving it for 1500 miles, the rear axle started making some ugly noises. Unfortunately, the bearing wear allowed the pinion shaft to walk back and forth which damaged the ring and pinion gears.  Ferrari 250′s are notorious for having a low final drive ratio so since we had to replace the R&P, we decided to change from a 7-32 to a 8-34 so when the car is up and running I will report on the how the characteristics of the car change. A friend of mine with a 400 5-speed put a rear axle center section from a 400 Automatic in his car only to find that the car felt sluggish and less than athletic. Going from a manual to automatic rear axle ratio is drastic where we are only changing the ratio in this project slightly, from 4.57:1 to a 4.25:1. I would imagine that the ratio from an automatic would be something in the range of 3.5:1 versus a 4.11:1 with a 5-speed.

Just as I do with all of the early Ferrari axles we get in, this one will be converted to use a much more robust bearing assembly to make sure the expensive gears and other parts won’t be destroyed prematurely as this one has done. I’ve commented on this  before and I will note again that we don’t see axle failure on other cars such as Jaguar or Maseratis unless they are operated for an extended period of time without oil. With the Ferraris, we see catastrophic failure due to a cruddy design regardless of lubrication!

GT 250 Ferrari Axle

GT 250 Ferrari Axle

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Welding brass

Brass is a pain in the neck to weld, it doesn’t give you any clues as to its melting point like other metals. Steel gets shiny and looks like flowing liquid while aluminum gets super shiny and puffs up slightly which tells you when you can add the filler rod.

Brass just gets dark so you have to poke the area with the filler rod and hope it sticks even though it often just spatters and makes a mess. Unlike aluminum or steel, it is easy to build up brass on an edge of sheet metal like I am doing in these photos. What I found is that you have to keep the material extra clean with a stainless steel brush and glass bead blasting it when the piece gets black and nasty.

These photos are of little trim pieces on a Ferrari 166 Touring bodied Berlinetta that I am restoring. These pieces didn’t fit well from new,  I think my 6 year old daughter could have made them fit better. I have spent lots time welding on new material and filing it down to fit around the trim and re-locate the holes so the screws actually thread into something.

The reason Touring used brass is because it takes chrome nicely without any extra material like nickel or copper and is relatively easy to shape.

Brass Heli-arc

Brass Heli-arc

Tungston Inert Gas Brass

Tungston Inert Gas Brass

Brass trim welded and fitting

Brass trim welded and fitting

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Ferrari Coolant pipes

Ferrari water pipes

Ferrari water pipes

Here is a fixture we made to duplicate the often rusty steel water pipes on Ferrari 250 engines. I make them from Stainless Steel so they should last for much longer than the originals.  I have a drawer full of the parts needed to make these such as the 2 ear flanges and the temp sensor ports as well as pre-bent tubing.

Ferrari 250 GT coolant tubing

Ferrari 250 GT coolant tubing

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Ferrari 250 Mille Miglia

In the mind of every vintage car enthusiast, the Mille Miglia may supersede heaven as the location of divine happiness. This lovely 250 GT Pininfarina Coupe was named 250 MM, short for the race it was designed for, the Mille Miglia. Even this carefully crafted and beautifully prepared car is not immune to the the throes of classic car ownership. The devil is in the details.100504_italy_250_MM_6127-01100504_italy_250_MM_6130-01

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Ferrari 212 and 340

For the first time in over 50 years, these former Marzotto team cars are sitting side by side,  prepared once again to compete in the Mille Miglia.  Are these cars like working dogs, border collies or sled dogs who are anxious to work almost to their own demise or are they dreading the stress of the event?

The lighter red car is a Ferrari 340 America serial number 0030MT that belonged to my father, Peter Markowski for 35 years. He bought it as a worn out race car when he was in his late teens and restored over the course of many years then driving it for close to 100,000 miles. In the late 90′s our shop restored it again, overhauling the engine, transmission, brakes and other components. We performed a flawless pant job on the car and Peter sold it shortly after all that work was completed because he was not comfortable driving the car with reckless abandon as he used to.

The car sold to its current owner in Europe who disliked the perfection so performed some magic to make the car look more original followed by competing in many driving events which added some true “battle scars”.  My father was probably quite emotional seeing this old piece of his history next to a car that he and his sons built from the ground up.

A well known Ferrari historian is working to make arrangements to have the two cars shipped to the home of  Giannino Marzotto at Lake Como for a photo shoot and possible magazine article.  I hope this works out as Signior Marzotto may have some incredible stories of racing these cars in the early 50′s.

Ferrari Marzotto 340

Ferrari Marzotto 340

Marzotto Team cars 212, 340 Ferrari

Marzotto Team cars 212, 340 Ferrari

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