Archive for Ferrari

Plastic Parts Made for Ferrari and Lamborghini

There were few replacement parts made for Ferrari and other Italian cars because the production numbers were so minimal and any stock was exhausted long ago. Many of the mechanical components for Ferrari’s are common to most models but the body and trim parts are getting hard to find.

I have taken it upon myself to make some parts. Long ago I made Air Conditioning vents, knobs, and little parts for 330GTC/GTS’s and 365′s. Every 330/365 at our shop is missing the alternator junction block cover and knob so I have re-made these parts. Often, the junction block itself is melted from years of engine bay heat and electrical heat so I make the complete units too.

Awhile ago, I made the thumb screws for Lamborghini air cleaner lids with the FIAMM logo.

Now, I am working on making some shift knobs, interior knobs and trying to make the vent window knob for the 330GTC so let me know if you need any of these parts.

If you need a part made, please let me know. Its easier to make a copy from an original part but I can make a part from a mechanical drawing as well. I am learning the techniques to make the molds, hard point holders and account for the shrinkage of the liquid plastic as it sets up.

Here are some of the parts I am making so far.

Plastic Reproduction Ferrari parts

Ferrari replacement parts, Plastic reproduction

Alternator Junction block Ferrari

Ferrari 330GTC Junction block

 

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Fall Drive

It was cool and rainy when we started the drive but as the day progressed, the sky cleared and the roads dried out. A number of Ferrari’s were on the drive as well as 3 generations of Porsche Turbo’s, a 1976, 1994 and 2011 that blasted over the leaf covered roads. A friend took some lovely photos of the cars at speed and here is one of my favorites. The car looks as though its hovering above the road but swimming more than hovering in the air.

Ferrari 275 GTB/4

4 Cam 275GTB.

Zach, Bill and I organize a few of these day long tours and you can learn more about them through the Europa Mothership website.

 

 

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Very Orignal Ferrari 330GT 2+2

If you ask someone who remembers owning or servicing Ferrari’s back in the 1950′s or 1960′s, they will probably tell you that they weren’t very well finished. My father often says that we make the cars significantly better than they were when new. Judges on the show field have been known to deduct points for a car that is “over-restored” which must be a very hard thing to determine.

Most Ferrari’s from the 50′s and 60′s have Borrani wire wheels. How brightly they are polished seems like a bit of a sliding scale. If you spend $5000 to have your wheels rebuilt, don’t you want them to be highly polished? I have seen many photos of a Ferrari chassis rolling on Borrani wheels while the body is being constructed at a coach builders shop so there is no way the wheels were shiny after that gritty process. I would guess that Borrani used more of an industrial chrome plating on the spokes and hubs and lightly polished the alloy rim but you wouldn’t need sunglasses to look at them!

Another example is the satin black paint on the chassis and engine bay. From what I have seen, it appeared to have been hastily applied by brush right over dirt and weld spatter. I’ve always tried tried to imagine how the rubberized undercoating was applied and picture someone holding up cardboard to prevent over-spray while blowing it on in heavy coats.

Pininfarina used some different practices than Scaglietti but overall, I think there was lots of similarity. Pininfarina used super heavy rubberized undercoating that looked like sagging elephant skin. Scaglietti used a lighter coat of “pebbly” rubberized undercoat.

Anyhow, we had a incredibly orignal 1964 Ferrari 330GT 2+2 in the shop last month. This car has 3000 miles and was perfectly preserved in a dry climate so you can see all the evidence of the original build practices. In the next few blog posts, I will show some of the intricate details on how this car was finished 50 years ago. If you are interested in getting a flash drive of all the details of this car, let me know.

Rear Leaf Spring Ferrari 330GT Chassis

Ferrari 330GT Chassis Rear

Here, you can see the thick “elephant skin” undercoating and other details like black oxide radius arm bolts. You can see lots of gold over-spray on the thick undercoating. This may mean the car was painted after the undercoating or the car was touch up after it was assembled. There are many other areas of touched up paint on the car.

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Front Suspension detail of Ferrari 330GT

Note the think Dijon mustard colored paint on the bottom of the cross member but the thick dripping black paint on the radiator support. The Chassis does not appear to have been painted like many restored cars. It is more a blend of over spray and rubberized undercoating. Note how sloppily the yellow tamper evident paint was applied!

Undercoating details on a Pininfarina Ferrari

Undercoating on a Ferrari 330GT 2+2

Look at the heavy undercoating on the chassis tube.

 

 

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Dino 206GT

Late last summer a customer called me to pick up his newly acquired Dino 206GT. He told me that it was fully restored in the UK but needed to be checked out after the overseas voyage and address a few little squeaks and issues. Then he asked, “How long will it take?” Having never seen the car, I told him that I can’t estimate the timing but will get it scooped up right away.

Like the other projects we have received lately, the car was absolutely magnificent…. but nothing worked. Someone made a custom muffler that vibrated and leaked so badly that we had to replace it. The fuel filler neck hose was installed with such a kink that it split allowing gas to spray all over on right hand turns or when filling it with gas. The brand new clutch cable was rubbing so hard against the steering U-Joint that it wore through it and made the steering feel horrible. After moving the cable away from the steering shaft, the steering still felt horrible because the pinion shaft on the rack was loose and moving up and down.

Ultimately, we did a ton of mechanical repairs and ended up addressing some cosmetic items and made the car drive wonderfully. I drove the car home and needed the defroster fan which I could hear humming away but it wasn’t moving any air. When I got to the shop, I found that the fan housing was cracked which someone tried to seal with an excessive amount of silicone. They inadvertently glued the fan blade to the housing and the motor shaft was spinning inside the fan blade! Insane.

This car is so beautiful that I didn’t want it hanging around the shop for too long, you’ll see what I mean from these photos.

 

Ferrari 206GT Dino

Dino Ferrari 206

1969 Ferrari 206GT Dino

Ferrari Dino 1969

 

Ferrari 206GT Blower Fan

Blower Fan Ferrari Dino 206

Filler Neck Hose Ferrari Dino

Ferrari Dino Filler Neck hose

 

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Ferrari 365GTC Interesting Photo

After a massive amount of work, I brought this 1969 Ferrari 365GTC out for photographs and caught this Barn Swallow in the image!  Photo Bomb! If I new how to edit this image you would see that the bird is very well focused and clear.

Bird caught in the image of a Ferrari 365

Ferrari 365GTC with bird

 

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Ferrari Daytona Deer Accident

This Daytona came in recently for repairs after it struck a deer. We had to rebuild so much of the front, all the tubing was bent and radiator was damaged. We were happy with how it came out. It was a struggle to find out how the front plexi-glass should look when finished because there were so many different details from the cars we photographed.

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Repair to the front of a Ferrari Daytona

Ferrari 365GTB/4 Front repair

Accident Repair Ferrar 365

Front end to a Ferrari 365GTB/4 Daytona

Bodywork repair on Ferrari Daytona

Ferrari Daytona Bodywork

 

Ferrari Daytona Coupe Early Production

Plexiglass front Daytona Coupe

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Interesting 308GTB Interior

After posting about the “Fran Tarkington” 308 interior, it reminded me about the other 308GTB that I bought this year with the red corduroy upholstery on the seats. Do you think this is original? Its too cool and Italian to NOT be original!

Unique interior in cloth Ferrari 308

Ferrari 308GTB Cloth Interior

Cloth Upholstery Ferrari 308

Ferrari 308GTB Red cloth Upholstery

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Late Production Ferrari 308GTB

Even though this is a 1979 Ferrari 308GTB, it has the next series GTBi (fuel injected) type of interior. At first I though it may have been changed to the more contemporary pattern but I thought that with the low miles, it was likely original. I bought the car from a guy in Kansas and was pleasantly surprised when it arrived because it had a super complete book and tool pouch. When I opened the warranty book, I found that it was sold new to Francis Tarkenton! Kind of cool even though I am not into football. Why didn’t I keep this car?

Original owner Fran Tarkington

Francis Tarkenton Warranty Card

1980 carburettor 308GTB

308GTB 1980

Later model 308GTB interior in a 1980

308GTB Interior

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Ferrari 206 Dino

This is a lovely Dino 206 that arrived earlier this fall. It has had a ton of service including a full engine overhaul but it never ran well. We did a little carburetor tuning and checked over some items and couldn’t pin point what was going on.

Rolf disassembled the distributor and found this disaster, totally worn out flyweight pivots. They shouldn’t be “C” shaped, they should pivot on the pin with a close tolerance round hole. Once we installed new weights and dialed in the advance curve, the engine ran like a champion.

206′s are my favorite of all Ferraris, so small and delicate and stunningly beautiful. I am working on purchasing a few of them, one of which has a racing Stratos “Doppia Accensione” or “twin plug” engine. Once I sell the 206 at the Gooding auction this January, I hope to have the money to buy this other car.

Distributor advance weights

Ferrari 206 Ignition Distributor

Dino 206 Scaglietti

Ferrari 206 Dino

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Ferrari Steering Gearboxes

Earlier this year, a good customer drove to the shop in his 1967 Ferrari 330GTC for some service work and asked me to critique the way his car handles. We went for a spin and I immediately understood what he was talking about, when entering a curve it took lots of “input” in order navigate a corner and even go straight down the road. I use the word “navigate” because it handles like a boat.

We have had the suspension aligned and he had it aligned at his local shop a few times in an attempt to remedy this problem but it still steers super slowl. We compared it to a few other cars that day which validated our feelings, there was something wrong with his car.

Ferrari used ZF steering boxes in all of the cars from the mid 50′s through to the Daytona in the early 70′s.  A 1:20 ratio was chosen for the 330GTC but the 275GTB of the same year used a faster 1:17 ratio. My solution was to buy a brand new 1:17 worm gear to replace the 1:20 and see how it goes down the road.

The handling was transformed and it finally felt like a sports car. The 1:17 ratio was the perfect match for the car, even the steering effort at parking speed wasn’t compromised. I really don’t understand why the 330 got the slower steering but I have since changed the ratio in three other GTC’s. If you have a 330GTC or even a 330 GT 2+2, you’ve got to install this faster ratio steering box, you will love the transformation

Ferrari 330 Steering Box

330GTC Steering Gear Box

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